HKQ Kids

Focusing on Homework

Every parent wants their children to do well in school. As parents we feel it is our responsibility for our kids to succeed, and doing well in school is an indication that they are on the right road. However, getting your children to focus on homework after a few months of summer fun can have its challenges. Kids can rebel by forgetting to bring home books, or may do an assignment quickly to get it over with. Motivating them to get off to a successful start can be a challenge, but it isn’t impossible.

• Guide them, but don’t control them. Ask yourself what has worked in the past. What happened differently when they completed homework without a hassle? What was different? Ask your son or daughter for their input, and believe them. See what motivates them, as opposed to what motivates you.

• Don’t engage in arguments. Step away from the temptation to raise your voice, take a break.

• With input from your child, set a plan. Help your child to become organized.

• Set limits around homework. Homework should be done at the same time each night, in a common place in your home, as opposed to their room. If grades aren’t up to par, take away television or phone time to allow for more concentration time. And make it a rule that weekend activities don’t happen until homework is done.

• Allow your children to do their own homework, and allow them to accept the consequences if they decide to do a less than satisfactory job. If grades drop, offer assistance. Ask if they are happy with their grade, and if not, how can you help.

• Establish open and honest communication with your child’s teacher. Discuss progress as you need to. Review homework with your child if necessary. Present a united front at home with your spouse or partner regarding homework and do not divert.

• If your child has a learning disability, they may need more help. For example, some kids need a little more guidance; you may need to sit near your child and help a little more. Just be careful not to over-help, as they can become dependent on your help. Let them try to think things through on their own.

To help your child succeed, it’s important to set up a structure. And within that structure, you can expect your child to do what he has to do to be a good student. Setting up good homework habits early in the year will help develop your child’s problem-solving skills. And that is one of the greatest gifts we can give our children for life-long success. Every parent wants their children to do well in school. As parents we feel it is our responsibility for our kids to succeed, and doing well in school is an indication that they are on the right road. However, getting your children to focus on homework after a few months of summer fun can have its challenges. Kids can rebel by forgetting to bring home books, or may do an assignment quickly to get it over with. Motivating them to get off to a successful start can be a challenge, but it isn’t impossible.

• Guide them, but don’t control them. Ask yourself what has worked in the past. What happened differently when they completed homework without a hassle? What was different? Ask your son or daughter for their input, and believe them. See what motivates them, as opposed to what motivates you.

• Don’t engage in arguments. Step away from the temptation to raise your voice, take a break.

• With input from your child, set a plan. Help your child to become organized.

• Set limits around homework. Homework should be done at the same time each night, in a common place in your home, as opposed to their room. If grades aren’t up to par, take away television or phone time to allow for more concentration time. And make it a rule that weekend activities don’t happen until homework is done.

• Allow your children to do their own homework, and allow them to accept the consequences if they decide to do a less than satisfactory job. If grades drop, offer assistance. Ask if they are happy with their grade, and if not, how can you help.

• Establish open and honest communication with your child’s teacher. Discuss progress as you need to. Review homework with your child if necessary. Present a united front at home with your spouse or partner regarding homework and do not divert.

• If your child has a learning disability, they may need more help. For example, some kids need a little more guidance; you may need to sit near your child and help a little more. Just be careful not to over-help, as they can become dependent on your help. Let them try to think things through on their own.
To help your child succeed, it’s important to set up a structure. And within that structure, you can expect your child to do what he has to do to be a good student. Setting up good homework habits early in the year will help develop your child’s problem-solving skills. And that is one of the greatest gifts we can give our children for life-long success.

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